EVENTS 2019

 

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JANUARY 2019

ARTICLE AND PHOTOGRAPHS

“LISTENING: MUSINGS AT THE MORRIS MUSEUM”

By Iris Brooks

Photographs by Jon H. Davis and Iris Brooks

Morris Museum

6 Normandy Heights Rd.

Morristown, New Jersey

www.morrismuseum.org

“If speaking is silver, then listening is gold.”

-Turkish Proverb

Is listening a lost art?

Sensory bombardment sometimes obscures

a quality listening experience.

This is on my mind while visiting three music exhibits at the Morris Museum in Morristown, New Jersey. Particularly striking is the audio installation by John Morton, incorporating vocal sounds of the human ecstatic experience from many lands.

SCULPTURE IN VALLETTA, MALTA  PHOTO © JON H. DAVIS

AUTOMATON AT MORRIS MUSEUM  PHOTO © IRIS BROOKS

To Read the Full Article Accompanied by Original Photos

CLICK THE IMAGE BELOW.

EVENT ARCHIVES 2018

To See the Video FEVER SONGS, CLICK THE IMAGE BELOW

CONCERT

“JUDSON DANCE THEATER:

A COLLECTIVE SPECULATION”

MoMA PS1

22-25 Jackson Ave.

Queens, New York

Sunday, January 27, 2-6 PM

Featuring Live Music By Philip Corner - Gongs


With

Iris Brooks - Flute

David Demnitz - Guitar

Daniel Goode - Clarinet

Phoebe Neville - Voice

Leyna Marika Papach - Violin

Philip Corner will be returning from Italy, where he resides, for this New York performance, which is taking place 35 years after he composed, Gamelan Iris. This concert of music by Philip Corner will feature his Lovely Music and Om Entrance along with a symposium honoring the historic Judson Dance Theater movement.

MoMA PS1 is the first non-profit arts center in the country devoted solely to contemporary art and is an affiliate of The Museum of Modern Art. The concert and symposium, “Judson Dance Theater: A Collective Speculation” is organized in conjunction with the MoMA exhibit, Judson Dance Theater: The Work is Never Done through February 3 at their main venue (11 West 53rd St. in Manhattan). 

CLICK POSTER for More Information and Tickets.

FEBRUARY 2019

Celebrating Losar, or the new year in Tibet, Bhutan, Nepal, and parts of northern India takes place annually and this seasonal festival is an opportunity to rid oneself of the old, and welcome the new. The sacred holiday pays tribute to wisdom and compassion. This year the ceremonies–coordinating with the first new moon on the Tibetan calendar–occur in early February 2019. It is the Year of the Earth Pig, symbolizing good fortune, and while the festival originally began with farmers, the scope of the Buddhist celebration has expanded.

Losar is a time to clean one’s house of unneeded items, offer incense to local spirits, and place water on the altar to ensure a good harvest. In a purification ritual, lamps are lit, a torch is used to get rid of the old (physical), and firecrackers are set off to chase away evil (metaphysical), monsters, and bad luck. Colorful prayer flags are changed and some monks create large yak butter sculptures known as tsepdro. Others celebrate the festive occasion with games of darts and archery or by singing and dancing to dispel negative forces.

Traditional roasted barley cereal, tsampa is eaten for breakfast. Other holiday foods are guthuk noodles made from nine ingredients such as mandarin oranges, dried cheese, and green bananas. Dough balls or dumplings can be tasty treats, but they have hidden treasures inside at this time, some of which are meant to be humorous, such as a chili pepper representing talking too much. A white item inside, such as salt or rice is symbolic of being a good person and having luck for the coming year, while black coal inside the dough refers to a black heart.

In China, where red is the preferred color for dress and decorations for their new year (coinciding with the new moon), food also has special meanings. In southern China, spring rolls are eaten to usher in the spring. Chinese dumplings also have significance during their new year festival, in which eating them is said to send away the old and welcome the new. If you eat the dumpling with the coin inside, it ensures good luck for the year. And rice cakes are consumed with the belief that the new year will be better than the previous one. The Chinese New Year, also related to their Spring Festival, is celebrated with lantern statues, lion dances, and parades. It is a time many Chinese journey home to celebrate with their families.


-Iris Brooks

ALL PHOTOS FROM BHUTAN  © JON  H. DAVIS  & IRIS BROOKS

CONCERT REHEARSAL

SOHO, NEW YORK

“Before the Dome at MoMA PS1”

Photo Montage By Jon H. Davis

MUSICIANS: Philip Corner - Composer, Gong, and Voice

Iris Brooks - Flute

David Demnitz - Electric Guitar

Daniel Goode - Clarinet

Phoebe Neville - Voice and Gong

Leyna Marika Papach - Violin

VALENTINE’S DAY

CELEBRATING THE DAY OF THE HEART


WITH LOVE POETRY BY PETRARCH,

Italian Renaissance Poet & Father of Humanism